Who is distracted?

Students aren’t the only ones distracted by cell phones

January 27, 2017

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With the cell phone policy being enforced an even greater amount than it used to be, what is really going to affect classrooms? Yes, cell phones are a major distraction for students, but cell phones aren’t only affecting students. Some fear that with teachers enforcing the cell phone policy it is going to keep the teacher’s attention focused on keeping cell phones out of class instead of actual teaching.

Junior Kamryn Horne has a strong opinion on students and teachers with cell phone distractions.

“We’re in high school now, we should be responsible enough to stay off our phones during a lesson,” Horne said. “But a teacher shouldn’t let a student stop an entire class from learning because of their electronics.”

Junior Oscar De Los Santos has already had this experience this semester.

“I’ve been in a handful of classes where the teacher stops the entire class simply because he/she wants students to put it away and listen to the lecture,” De Los Santos said.

Oscar’s has a strong opinion on the topic of what distractions are going to arise with stricter phone policy.

“I do believe that teachers become distracted when faced with the issue of cell phones. Not only that but it takes away from sacred learning time and even more because some individuals refuse to obey which ultimately ends up affecting the entire class,” De Los Santos said.

With more issues rising around cell phones we as a school need to work together in order to keep focused and try not to interrupt valuable learning time.

Cell phones can be both a negative and a positive in the classroom, but we have to learn to acknowledge that there are certain things that need to be accomplished at school and not all of them are on a cell phone. While cell phones are a distraction for both students and teachers we have to learn to respect those who are focused and ready to expand their knowledge.  

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