Spotlight

  • February 9“I can live for two months on a good compliment." - Mark Twain

  • August 5To order a yearbook, visit www.yearbookforever.com or see Mr. Hayes in X109.

K-What? K-Pop.

K-Pop

Joey Chadwick, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






K-Pop is blowing up in America lately and some people have never heard of the music genre.

K-Pop is a music genre that originated from South Korea,  characterized by a wide variety of audiovisuals elements.

K-Pop started in the late 1980s when the first K-Pop group was formed, Seo Taiji and Boys. The first known Korean pop album was “Yi Pungjin Sewol” (This Tumultuous Time), by Park Chae-seon and Lee Ryu-saek in 1925, which contained popular songs translated from Japanese.

People put up their money and actively engaging in K-pop and are much more substantial ways to see K-pop’s growth in America than, say, watching a viral video.

“I think K-Pop is getting popular in the U.S. because people are getting more intrigued by it. It’s becoming more known especially through social media,” senior Maddy Rust said.

“In my opinion, K-Pop is getting more recognition in America because of the visuals in music videos. BTS is the group that is in the spotlight right now and that started with their Blood Sweat and Tears era. Before that, most people’s image of K-Pop was bright, colorful, childlike songs but BTS used darker colors, darker theories, and more adult-like lyrics and feels, demanding for the attention it deserved,”  senior Smimi Akinrinsola said.

“ K-Pop is popular in the U.S. because as we learn about a different culture we become curious. K-Pop is one of those things where you listen to it and it’s stuck. It’s catchy stuff and the more you listen to it seems the happier you get,” senior Danielle Brandenburg said.

American pop is all about individually, so each pop star has his or her own kind of style. K-Pop stars have to be careful with what they do or else they’ll be criticized for it and ruin their image. American pop singer tend to be wild and free, people see them as being an individual and it being “okay.”

“K-Pop is different from the U.S. pop music for obvious reasons like language. There’s also many more boy groups and girl groups that America has. Overall though, the music style isn’t very different,” Rust said.

“K-Pop is different from Pop music in the U.S. in the sense the K-Pop also speaks on deeper issues. Unlike pop singers in the U.S. where their main topic is love and heartbreak,” Akinrinsola said.

“ The songs from K-Pop the artists make come from straight the heart and aren’t always about what we hear about in America today,” Brandenburg said.

By the beginning of the 21st century, the K-pop market had slumped and early K-pop idol groups that had seen success in the 90s were on the decline H.O.T. disbanded in 2001, while other groups like Sechs Kies, S.E.S., Fin. K.L, Shinhwa, and g.o.d became inactive by 2005.

Solo singers like BoA and Rain grew in success. However, the success of boy band TVXQ after its debut in 2003 marked the resurgence of idol groups to Korean entertainment and the growth of K-pop as part of Hallyu. The birth of second-generation K-pop was followed with the successful debuts of SS501, Super Junior, Big Bang, Wonder Girls, Girls’ Generation, Kara, and 2NE1. Other famous K-Pop artists are BTS, f(x), SHINee, EXO, BIGBANG, and BLACKPINK.

“I listen to many K-Pop stars/groups but my top 6 are BTS, EXO,GOT17, Monsta X, Seventeen, & B.A.P. I also listen to solo artists like Jay Park, Dean, Hyuna, DPR Live, IU, ect.,’ Rust said.

“The top 6 groups I listen to are BTS, EXO,  GOT17, Monsta X, and Astro. But there are also solo artists like Dean, Jay Park (who also makes English versions of his songs), Heize, IU, and Crush,”  Akinrinsola said.

“The K-Pop stars that I listen to don’t really sing solo. They’re mostly in groups and do solo stuff a little bit of the time. Listen to  BIGBANG, SHINee, EXO, Taeyang (from BIGBANG), Amber (from f(x)),” Brandenburg said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

The Ben Davis Spotlight intends for this area to be used to foster healthy, thought-provoking discussion. Comments are expected to adhere to our standards and to be respectful and constructive. As such, we do not permit the use of profanity, personal attacks, or the use of language that might be interpreted as libelous. Comments are reviewed and must be approved by a moderator to ensure that they meet these standards. The Ben Davis Spotlight does not allow anonymous comments and requires a valid email address. The email address will not be displayed.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    Fashion sense

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    Making Hershey history

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    2018 Hit Movies

  • Arts & Entertainment

    A time to sing

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    Winter homecoming spirit week!

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Books

    A quaking controversy

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    Pixar’s Coco is surrounded by worry

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    A More Mature Disney?

  • Arts & Entertainment

    Can You Make it Out?

  • K-What? K-Pop.

    Arts & Entertainment

    Creativity that knows no bounds

The official student news site of Ben Davis High School
K-What? K-Pop.